Tag: low cost franchise

You Don’t Have To Start A Business Alone

During this time of Covid, many people are thinking of starting a business. The fear of starting out on your own is a major stumbling block.

Read this post; These are the reasons not to run a business alone.

I am here to tell you there is a way to overcome that fear, franchise business ownership.

The franchise business model is a proven formula that you can easily follow. It is a great way to be in business for yourself and not by yourself. That is why there are 773,603 franchise establishments in 2019 and franchising a major driving factor in the US economy.

You should start by understanding your strengths and skills.

To learn more about franchise opportunities in your area, go to my calendar and set up a time for us to talk.

 

Employee vs. Franchise Ownership

Question about buying a franchise

Employee vs. Franchise Owner Facts and Stats

Not everyone is suited to own their own Franchise.  We have spoken to many people who are perfectly happy working for someone else.  Here are some Facts and Stats you may find interesting.

Employee- Facts & Stats

  1. Average American works >8.5 hours each day. This means more time spent working than:
  • Sleeping
  • Enjoying hobbies
  • Spending time with family and friends
  • A typical 40-year career which consists of working 50 weeks a year, 8.5 hour work days, will mean working 86,000 hours for the average Americans lifetime.
  1. The average American will spend over $600K in interest throughout their working life.
  2. Only 45% of Americans ARE satisfied with their jobs. This means that the majority (55%) of Americans are unsatisfied with their current job.
  3. 16% drop in job-satisfaction in just over 20 years
  • Unsatisfactory rates spring from disappointment in benefits, job stability, and growth
  1. 26% of Employees were dissatisfied with the outlook on potential future promotions (up from 19% in 2008)
  2. Less than 50% of employees were completely satisfied with their job security; with 30% of workers being worried about being laid off in the near future.
  3. Roughly 34% of employees were dissatisfied with the amount of on-the-job stress.
  4. There are currently more workers than jobs. This causes most workers to stay in these less-than-satisfactory conditions.
  5. As an employee, you are capped at contributing $16,500 pre-taxed into retirement fund annually; a business owner can contribute up to $50,000, pre-taxed.
  6. The average account balance in retirement plans according to an Employee Benefit Research Institute (or EBRI) study stated that participants in their 60’s had saved $144,004. Retirees should pull money from their 401k account at a withdrawal rate of 4%/year. When they allowing for an adjustment in inflation, this provides the average 401k holder in their 60’s an annual income of only $5,760, or $480 each month.
  7. The poverty level for 2011 was set at $15,130 (total yearly income) for a family of two or $1,261 a month.
  8. According to the 2010 Census Bureau, 79% of the population is a salary or private wage employee. Of that 79%, only 3.9% were earning more than $200K per year with the average working American sitting in the $50-$75K range.

Business Ownership and Franchise- Facts & Stats

  1. Two-thirds of all American millionaires are business owners.
  2. In a study by Scott Shane, a franchise scholar, the success rate of a franchise (62%) is nearly double that of an independent business (35%) after 4 years of operations.
  3. In 2011, franchise establishments employed nearly 8 million people with 735K units.
  4. “Active” Baby Boomers not quite ready or able to retire are turning to the $1.5 trillion segments of franchise businesses.
  5. As a business owner, you could be making the same amount in your business as in your last employment. However, you can keep more of your earnings with smart & legal tax deductions.
  6. As of 2009, entrepreneurial efforts in the U.S. were at a 14 year high, with 558,000 new businesses being started each month. It’s great for the economy and it’s an excellent opportunity for the business owner. Today, labor is abundant and less expensive, equipment and resources are discounted & real estate and rent is lower.
  7. Based on a study of an entrepreneur followed by the FBA in 2010, the initial investment, such as time, money, commitment, and frustration were all drastically reduced when investing in a franchise versus starting an independent business. The franchise business offers support, provides the opportunity to become passive and also has a considerably shorter learning curve (on average 9 months vs. 2.5 years).
  8. With a franchise, you often have sales assistance available.
  9. Upon purchasing a franchise you are provided an FDD, or Franchise Disclosure Document. This document includes all the background information of the franchise.
  • How many years it has been in business
  • Lawsuits and litigation history of the franchise and its executives
  • Initial and ongoing costs
  • Outlines what the franchisor offers to a franchisee
  • A list of current and former franchisees
  • The franchise financial statement and earnings information when it is available
  1. As a business owner purchasing a franchise you are provided with a complete system. You can be confident in your marketing plan, benchmarks, goals, and support that are required to make your business thrive.
  2. Thousands of franchises are available; some are brand new (under 1 year) and some have decades of industry experience.
  3. There are a plethora of options available with franchise systems. Some franchises allow you to operate out of your home; have or have no employees; have or have no inventory or be a passive owner.
  4. Banks are more likely to loan money to a successful franchise. They are willing to do this for a franchise compared to a start-up business because of a lower risk of repayment default.

The purchase of a franchise is a major decision. You should only make that decision after retaining and consulting with competent legal and business professionals.

www.ProfessionalFranchiseBrokers.com

Works Cited

Employee Facts and Stats

  1. Information can be found in The United States Department of Labor, The Bureau of Labor Statistics

Website

  1. http://www.bls.gov/tus/charts/chart1.pdf
  2. A fact mathematically taken from the chart found on The United States Department of Labor, The

Bureau of Labor Statistics website above.

  1. Sources are cited within the graphic from Credit Loan
  2. http://www.creditloan.com/infographics/a-lifetime-of-debt-the-financial-journey-of-theaverage-american/
  3. Information found on The NY Daily News website
  4. http://articles.nydailynews.com/2010-01-06/news/17944097_1_job-satisfaction-conferenceboard-research-group-lynn-franco and
  5. http://money.cnn.com/2010/01/05/news/economy/job_satisfaction_report/
  6. Information found on CNN Money
  7. http://money.cnn.com/2010/01/05/news/economy/job_satisfaction_report/
  8. These statistics can be found within the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity Report
  9. http://www.kauffman.org/uploadedfiles/kiea_2010_report.pdf
  10. This information has been stated on gallup.com, under
  11. http://www.gallup.com/poll/102898/us-workers-remain-largely-satisfied-their-jobs.aspx
  12. This statistic can be found in the chart at http://www.gallup.com/poll/149324/workers-unhappy-healthbenefits-promotions.aspx
  13. This fact is cited in the first paragraphs on
  1. This information can be found in the fifth paragraph on http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p560.pdf
  2. Information about Retirement Savings and 401k’s http://www.mint.com/blog/planning/cheer-up-yourenot-as-far-behind-on-retirement-savings-as-you-think/
  3. The figures are the 2012 HHS poverty guidelines as of January 26, 2012. (Source: http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/12poverty.shtml)Monthly percentage data calculated by FHCE and rounded to the nearest dollar.
  4. A Franchise Brokers Association Independent Study

Business and Franchise Facts and Stats

  1. Information can be found in The Entrepreneur Café, LLC website
  2. http://www.ecafellc.com/small-biz-stat/first-generation-entrepreneurs-make-forbes-list
  3. These statistics are stated in the second paragraph under the section titled Independent Small Business

Failure Rates http://www.bluemaumau.org/what_success_rate_a_franchise_versus_independent

  1. This information can be found within the text at http://buyafranchiseblog.com/?m=201101
  2. This statistic can be found in the article at Blue Mau Mau, here: http://www.bluemaumau.org/2006_franchise_trends
  3. This fact is cited in the graph on the Kauffman Foundation website here http://www.kauffman.org/newsroom/despite-recession-us-entrepreneurial-activity-rate-rises-in-2009.aspx
  4. This statement on FDD’s can be found on the FBA website here http://blog.franchiseba.com/franchisenews/need-to-get-your-business-funded-consider-a-franchise/
  5. A Franchise Brokers Association Independent Study
  6. A Franchise Brokers Association Independent Study
  7. This information can be found on the FTC website here http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/franchise/amendedrule-faqs.shtml#26, specifically in points 20-22.
  8. A Franchise Brokers Association Independent Study
  9. This information can be found at http://franchise.org/franchiseesecondary.aspx?id=52630
  10. This information can be found at http://franchise.org/franchiseesecondary.aspx?id=52630
  11. A representative at M&I Bank

The purchase of a franchise is a major decision. You should only make that decision after retaining and consulting with competent legal and business professionals.

 

Owner-Operator vs. Semi-Absentee

Money

Owner-Operator vs. Semi-Absentee vs. Passive Ownership: What’s the Difference?

As husband and wife, we starting our first business nearly 17 years ago. Prior to our marriage, we both started businesses but with little success. Starting your own business is a lot of work. A business can take over your life, especially if it the first time you start a business. The upside is that it can be the most rewarding decision you make.

Our first business together was a franchised business. We were starting with a proven business model and a corporate team (and franchise community) to help make us successful. It was an owner-operator model and not suited for a semi-absentee model. So, what is the difference?

In franchising, you will hear the terms owner-operator, semi-absentee, passive ownership. Each type of ownership requires considerable time and effort on your part. A semi-absentee model or passive ownership may be a right fit for someone who still needs to maintain a job or has other obligations while building their business.

Let’s break down the differences between each model.

Owner-Operator:

This option allows the business owner to be completely hands-on. You will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of your business. This does not mean that will be doing ALL the work. You may oversee 2 people or 20 people depending on the model.

This requires you to be fully committed to the business.  You can’t hold down another job and if you have other obligations, they should be more hands off for you.

In our journey, we started as owner-operator and grew the business to the point where we were able to be semi-absentee owners.

Semi-Absentee:

As a semi-absentee owner, you needn’t worry so much about hiring and training the right employees for your business because you would hire a manager. They will handle many of the day-to-day operations. A semi-absentee owner must be comfortable enough to give up some control. It can give them the opportunity to concentrate on the part of the business they do well, and someone else takes over the areas they are weak. For example, if you don’t like networking but love back-office operations, you can hire a marketing manager that will attend the networking functions.

Keep in mind that you can’t just open the doors, put your feet on the desk and wait for the revenue to roll in. There is work that needs to be done and at the end of the day, it is YOUR business. You are ultimately responsible for its success. As a leader, you will need to be able to make key decisions and provide clear direction for your team.

Fully Passive Ownership

Fully passive ownership is the stage of your business where you are no longer involved in the day-to-day operations. The business has developed systems and processes that allow your employees to run the business. You now have time to concentrate on the strategic side of your business or possibly explore other business opportunities.

In franchising, becoming a fully passive owner is a process that you grow into not something you do from day one. It is rare for a franchise system to allow fully passive ownership for a new franchisee. The benefit of a franchise is that it can get you a fully passive model sooner than a non-franchise business.

Which is best for me?

Each ownership models offer distinct benefits. The right fit when choosing a franchise is important. Many franchise opportunities are best suited to an owner-operated model but many opportunities work very well as semi-absentee. In most case, you can start as an owner-operator and grow into a semi-absentee owner, just like we did with our first business.

If you like hands-on management and enjoy day-to-day operations, then an owner-operator is the model that best suits you. You will be knee-deep in the business and you will see the rewards of your hard work.

Being a semi-absent owner allows you more flexibility and you can start a business while working another job. On the flip side, it does have its own set of challenges. You must be comfortable with your business being managed by others. There is extra pressure on you to hire and retain top talent to make the business successful.

The choice is yours and each model offers benefits depending on your personality, time constraints and your desire to run the daily operation. No matter which model you choose, franchising offers you the best chance of success.

Owning a Low Cost Franchise

Freedom

Did you know you can own a low cost franchise business where you actually enjoy working?

Low cost franchise opportunities do exist and offer a great introduction into franchising.  These opportunities can be great for the candidate looking for something part-time, with minimal money to invest, can be a passive business, minimal or no employees and you can expand your net worth.  In addition to being low cost, some are great recession resistant opportunities because businesses need more business in any economy.

An ideal franchisee is an outgoing professional who enjoys interacting with others. You should be comfortable making presentations to small groups, organized, and upbeat. You should enjoy working with people and have a willingness to follow a proven method is a MUST.  After all you are buying a proven franchising system.

These opportunities can be run from your home office, a smart phone, iPad or tablet thus making it more affordable to get started.  Start small and grow.  All of the franchises have excellent support, cutting edge technology, some have high quality referral programs, award winning marketing programs and training to help make you successful.   All of this is included in your franchise fee.

The ideal candidate may need:

  • Solid business background
  • Sales and marketing oriented
  • Excellent communicator
  • Decision maker and problem solver
  • Relationship builder

There is a little known fact – many franchisors offer discounts for Veterans, Firefighters, Policemen, Emergency First Responders, minorities and multiunit discounts are available to those who qualify and can help stretch your investment dollars even further.

To get started, please contact us at:

1-888-246-0027 or mike@professionalfranchisebrokers.com

Corporate Visit

Our First and Only Corporate Visit

At the time it seemed to be a waste of time. We understood the concept – non-medical in home care for seniors. We knew it was going to involve managing a lot of people. We knew they had a system in place and other franchisees were successful even though it was a new franchise. We jumped in our car and decided to take a road trip out to Dayton, Ohio to visit Comfort Keepers. Why not combine seeing America and have a little fun on the way (I fell in love with the city of Pittsburgh, it is really a neat city).

We drive up to the office building excited. We were not sure of what to expect and what type of dog and pony show we were about to see. Clustered together with some other couples we were herded into the conference / training room and the founders began to talk about how their company started and the need the fulfilled in their community. We began to relate their experiences with our own family members and saw how we can make a difference in the lives of others. SOLD.

More Research

Were we being too hasty? We had only visited 1 franchise and there was one more like it we knew about. Why not look at the competitor? What was their corporate culture like? We seemed to fit in with Comfort Keepers. Calls were made to some of the franchisees, we asked my Dad, who is a CPA to look at their Profit and Loss and Balance Sheet for us and to give us questions to ask about the soundness of their company.

We still had jobs. We were beginning to hate what we were doing and how we were being treated. The thoughts of taking control of our lives was dominating our conversations. The fear of doing something new would always bring us back to the fact that we still had jobs. One by one our colleagues began to disappear. Mike and I realized the clock was ticking faster and it was time to say yes.

Our personal journey to buying a franchise

Mike and Laura

We never looked back.

We would like to share with you our journey to buying our first franchise with this three part series.

We bought our first franchise (YTD we have owned 6) back in 2001 pre 911. The economy was about to go through a Tech Bubble and we lived in Northern Virginia – just about a perfect storm. There is never a perfect predictor of how outside conditions can influence your outcomes.

I knew my job at US Office Products was going to disappear as we were purchased by Corporate Express and I did not fit their corporate mold and Mike knew his days were numbered as the Tech Startup he worked at was cutting fat in order to be sold (laying off employees with false stock promises). This was in May of 2001.

At that time we began to look at our resumes riddled with jobs that lasted 3 to 5 years and the thought of having to look for another job every few years was most unappealing. That was the beginning of the “new economy.” We needed to break the cycle.

We took inventory of our skills and experiences. We did a SWOT analysis. We searched the internet. We visited some franchise brick and mortars. We researched and researched and then we asked my Dad for advice. We bought a book about franchising and read that cover to cover. Then we began to trust our instincts.

Our First and Only Corporate Visit

At the time it seemed to be a waste of time. We understood the concept – non-medical in home care for seniors. We knew it was going to involve managing a lot of people. We knew they had a system in place and other franchisees were successful even though it was a new franchise. We jumped in our car and decided to take a road trip out to Dayton, Ohio to visit Comfort Keepers. Why not combine seeing America and have a little fun on the way (I fell in love with the city of Pittsburg, it is really a neat city).

We drive up to the office building excited. We were not sure of what to expect and what type of dog and pony show we were about to see. Clustered together with some other couples we were herded into the conference / training room and the founders began to talk about how their company started and the need the fulfilled in their community. We began to relate their experiences with our own family members and saw how we can make a difference in the lives of others. SOLD.

More Research

Were we being too hasty? We had only visited 1 franchise and there was one more like it we knew about. Why not look at the competitor? What was their corporate culture like? We seemed to fit in with Comfort Keepers. Calls were made to some of the franchisees, we asked my Dad, who is a CPA to look at their Profit and Loss and Balance Sheet for us and to give us questions to ask about the soundness of their company.

We still had jobs. We were beginning to hate what we were doing and how we were being treated. The thoughts of taking control of our lives was dominating our conversations. The fear of doing something new would always bring us back to the fact that we still had jobs. One by one our colleagues began to disappear. Mike and I realized the clock was ticking faster and it was time to say yes.

If you would like to begin your journey, we are here to help. Take the first step and complete a no obligation application. We will work closely with you during the entire process to help ensure your selection of the franchise that is right for you.